Scripting Component



The purpose of the scripting-component is to reduce and simplify the communication required to interact with the Temporal Wars game engine.

The scripting-component is responsible for communicating to Temporal Wars internal components. This eliminates the need for the game developer to understand the direct classes and structures required to interact with Temporal Wars engine directly.

To facilitate this interaction, the scripting-component contains two important static classes; scripting-conditions and scripting-actions. These two classes provide many methods you can use to interact with the Temporal Wars engine and will probably account for most of the source code in your games.

Looking at the "My Game's Call Hierarchy" image above, notice the scripting-component sits in-between your game and the Temporal Wars engine. The advantage to this setup is the scripting-component decouples your game from directly communicating to the Temporal Wars engine.

Analyzing the game-stack further, notice the Temporal Wars engine sits on-top of Microsoft’s XNA framework. XNA framework is reponsible for interacting with the Direct-X libraries. XNA framework can be setup for both C# and VB environments. C# and VB, as seen in the "My Game's Call Hierarchy" image above, uses the MSIL layer to communicate to other native-code components.

The scripting-component is constructed to use a modular design. A game is created using game levels and game-level parts. The "Game Level" diagram above shows a game-level as an orange rectange. Each game-level consists of multiple game-level parts; the purple rectanges. A single game-level part can be triggered to run during a game-level. Multiple game-level parts can also be run simultaneously.

A game-level, in the scripting-component, starts with the initilization section, followed by calls to the level-part-start, level-part-update and level-part-end sections. The level-part-start and level-part-end are only called once per game-level. The level-part-update is continuosly called throughout the game-level, until the game developer decides to exit the current game-level. A new game-level is then triggered in the level-part-end section.




  • Windows OS Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 & 10
  • Intel 2.0 ghz CPU or similar
  • 4-MB Ram
  • .Net 4.0
  • XNA 4.0 Framework
  • Nvidia 5000 series or better.
  • TW Indie Game Engine




  • Windows OS Vista, 7, 8, 8.1 & 10
  • Intel 2.0 ghz CPU or similar
  • 4-MB Ram
  • .Net 4.0
  • XNA 4.0 Framework
  • Nvidia 5000 series or better.
  • Visual Studio Express 2010